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Museum Programs
Films in February
Join us on Friday evenings in February for our very popular annual Films in February series. We look for unique and meaningful, independent films--many with Michigan connections.

Fridays in February
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Rochester Hills Museum Calf Barn
Pre-registration is required
Admission: Members free (register using this form)
Non-Museum Member Admission $5.00 via PayPal

You do not need a PayPal account. PayPal accepts most major credit cards.

Please print your PayPal confirmation and bring it with you as proof of purchase.


At Home in Utopia
Friday, February 22
Photo from At Home in Utopia film
They wanted to change the American dream… In the mid-1920s, thousands of Jewish immigrant garment workers managed to catapult themselves out of urban slums and ghettos by pooling their resources and building four cooperatively owned and run apartment complexes in the Bronx.

At Home in Utopia focuses on the United Workers Cooperative Colony--the Coops – also known to local policemen as Little Moscow because this community of 2,000 people was dominated by Communists. An epic tale of the struggle for equity and justice across two generations, the film tracks the rise and fall of one community from the 1920s into the 1950s, paying close attention to the passions that bound them together and those that tore them apart.

Black History Month Program

Digging Underground: Uncovering & Removing the Myths of the Underground Railroad
Speaker: Jamon Jordan
Thursday, February 28th - 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Pre-registration is required
Admission: Members Free (register using this form)
                   Non-Members $5.00 via PayPal
 You do not need a PayPal account. PayPal accepts most major credit cards.

Photo of Jamon JordanDetroit’s role in the Underground Railroad has been either hidden or covered in legends. Please join Jamon Jordan, educator, historian and founder of Black Scroll Network, as he helps to uncover the truth about the significant role that men and women in Detroit played in fighting against slavery and helping thousands achieve freedom.



Founders Day imageFounder's Day
Sunday, March 10 at 2:00 pm
Museum Calf Barn
Admission is FREE
Please RSVP using this form
Delicious refreshments provided

The Rochester Hills Museum at Van Hoosen Farm is pleased to host the Rochester Historical Commission for our community’s recognition of Founder’s Day that celebrates the arrival of the James Graham family in the Rochester area on March 17, 1817, founding the first permanent settlement in Oakland County.

Enjoy a presentation by John Cohassey and his presentation of The 22nd Michigan Infantry and the Road to Chickamauga. The 22nd Michigan is where most of the Rochester and Avon Township (Rochester Hills) soldiers served. In addition, you will be entertained by the Shannon Irish Dance Academy of Rochester Hills.
Women's History Lecture Series

Thursdays in March at 7:00 pm
Rochester Hills Museum Calf Barn
Pre-registration is required
Admission: Members free (register using this form)
Non-Museum Member Admission $5.00 via PayPal

You do not need a PayPal account. PayPal accepts most major credit cards.

Please print your PayPal confirmation and bring it with you as proof of purchase.


Photo of Petticoat PatriotsPetticoat Patriots: How Michigan Women Won the Vote
March 7th at 7:00 pm
Presented by Riley Hubbard of Michigan Women Forward #HERStory

Discover the inspirational story of how Michigan women won the vote! This program traces the history of the women’s rights movement from its beginnings among the abolitionists and Quakers through its final passage of the 19th Amendment.

Photo of At Home and Over ThereAt Home and Over There: American Women Physicians in World War I
March 14th at 7:00 pm
Presented by the American Women’s Medical Association

The Museum is proud to share the American Medical Women’s Association Exhibition and documentary that celebrate the contributions of women who, despite the capabilities equal to their male colleagues, were not permitted the same military rank and privilege. Unable to surmount these barriers, they still made lasting contributions to the war efforts. AMWA has produced this video to highlight the contributions of these unsung heroes.

Photo of Van Hoosen HallBuildings of MSU and the Women they Honor
March 21st at 7:00 pm
Presented by Megan Badgley-Malone

Many buildings at Michigan State University bear the name of women, but seldom are the stories of these women heard. Megan Badgley-Malone will share these stories including that of Van Hoosen Hall.

Photo of Bessie ColemanWomen Who Changed America by Marie Papciak
March 28th at 7:00 pm

Marie Papciak transforms into two women who changed America and tells their stories in first person. Join us for this HERstory presentation to “meet” Bessie Coleman and Laura Smith Haviland. Bessie Coleman was the first woman pilot of African-American descent and the first of Native American descent. Her pioneering was an inspiration to early pilots and to those in the communities of her heritage.
Photo of Laura Smith Haviland

Laura Smith Haviland was an abolitionist, suffragette and temperance worker who lived in Lenawee County in the Michigan Territory. She was part of the community group that organized the first anti-slavery organization in Michigan in 1832. She also opened the first racially integrated school in Michigan. Her home was the first Underground Railroad station in Michigan.



Cabin Fever Lecture Series
Fridays in March at 7:00 pm
Rochester Hills Museum Calf Barn
Pre-registration is required
Admission: Members free (register using this form)
Non-Museum Member Admission $5.00 via PayPal

You do not need a PayPal account. PayPal accepts most major credit cards.
    

Please print your PayPal confirmation and bring it with you as proof of purchase.


Photo of Gold MinersIt all Began with a Glint and a Glimmer 
March 1st at 7:00 pm
Presented by Debbie Remer

Following the discovery of gold in California in 1848, thousands of people headed west to make their fortunes. A good number of those were from Michigan, with several from Stony Creek, including Joshua Van Hoosen. Join Debbie Remer to learn about their travels to and from California, what they encountered once they arrived and the effect that this discovery had right here at home.

Photo of author Leslie PielackThe Saginaw Trail from Native American Path to Woodward Avenue
March 8th at 7:00 pm
Presented by Leslie Pielack

The Saginaw Trail led from the frontier town of Detroit into the wilderness, weaving through towering trees and swamps to distant Native American Villages. Presenting a forbidding landscape that was also a settler's paradise, the road promised great riches in natural resources like lumber and agriculture, and a future of wheeled vehicles that would make Michigan the center of global industry. Author and director of the Birmingham Museum, Leslie Pielack tells the story of the ancient path that transformed early Michigan and of the people whose lives intertwined with the iconic road.

Photo of the Chautauqua MovementThe Chautauqua Movement
March 15th at 7:00 pm
Presented by Jim Craft

The Chautauqua Movement originated in New York in 1874 as a two-week encampment for Sunday school teachers. Emphasizing Protestantism, education, recreation, and the arts, Chautauqua communities spread throughout the country – even into Michigan – bringing culture to thousands and shaping the political debates of the Progressive Era, including women’s suffrage, trust-busting, and child labor. Join author, Jim Craft, as he shares the history of the Chautauqua Movement.

Photo of Jim CassellMichigan Copper Mining: Black Powder Era
March 22nd at 7:00 pm
Presented by Jim Cassell

Collector of History, Jim Cassell, returns to share a his amazing collection of tools used during the 19th and early 20th centuries to mine copper in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Copper mining was first done by Native Americans in the Keweenaw Peninsula between 5000 and 1200 BCE. Shortly after Michigan’s statehood, mining companies were established and boomed from 1850 through 1881 producing 3/4 of the nation’s copper. Jim will amaze you with his collection and knowledge!



Photo of Ron RademacherNature Getaways
March 29th at 7:00 pm
Presented by Ron Rademacher

Author, adventurer, and storyteller, Ron Rademacher, will inspire you to explore the back roads of Michigan with this program that takes you on some of the most overlooked nature areas in our state. Each of these beautiful natural areas has easily accessible trails, usually less than a mile long, and you do not need to be a mountain climber to enjoy them! He shares all of the local attractions near each area and plans great trips for your enjoyment.

Michele Dunham
Michele Dunham
Education &
Program Coordinator
Email
248.841.2690



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